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Greg Jennings Doesn't Like His Ranking on the NFL Network Top 100 List; I Don't Like the Number of Receivers on the List

Last night, the NFL Network continued its unveiling of the Top 100 Players of 2011 as voted on by the players, going from #80 to #71. Packers wide receiver Greg Jennings was on that list at #74, behind 14 other wide receivers. Jennings was on the “after show” talking to Jay Glazer and Willie McGinest and wasn’t a big fan of that placement.

I can think of some guys that should be in front of me, I definitely can, but 14? I don’t know, personally, the selfish part of me that never creeps out . . . in the public eye, that is . . . I don’t think I could ever put 14 guys in front of me. Like I said, I’m a generous guy, not 14 guys.

Jennings is probably right about the 14 guys part. I was shocked to hear that we are at #70, and there are 14 more wide receivers to come. In looking at the list, Santonio Holmes, Mike Williams (Tampa Bay version) and Terrell Owens are also on the list below Jennings, meaning that there are 18 wide receivers on this list. That is absurd.

I don’t want to hear about the players complaining about fans not understanding the game. They had a chance to vote, and they put together a fantasy lineup. I can’t justify almost 20% of the top 100 being Wide Receivers, and exactly 20% of the remaining 70 selections being wideouts. I know that there are two of them on the field, but that just means there is often a lesser one, like with the left/right tackle dichotomy, or two cornerbacks.

Passing is king in the NFL, so I would expect a top 100 list to mirror value and not just have an equal number at each position. Defensive End, Quarterback, Receiver, Cornerbacks should probably have at least or more than 10% each of the selections. We could look at drafts to see how much value teams the positions, as a decent approximation of reality. In the last 10 drafts, teams have taken 37 receivers in the first round. That works out to 11.6% of first round picks. Franchise Player values also show that QB, DE, and OT are way out in front of WR, and OLB and CB are slightly in front. The wide receiver franchise number sits right in the middle of values. They should probably be roughly in line with a 2 out of 22 ratio (11.1%). That would have probably been a decent starting point, gauging by franchise player values and first round pick allocation: 11 receivers in the Top 100.

Instead, we are more than one and a half times that number. So I agree with Jennings that he should be higher within his position group. He is also probably ranked about right overall, because he’s about the 8th best receiver, and if the rankings truly reflected value, that would be somewhere around 74.

[photo via Getty]

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