Gregg Popovich Says He Respects Athletes Protesting National Anthem

MEMPHIS, TN - APRIL 22:  Head coach Gregg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs speaks to the media prior to game three of the Western Conference Quarterfinals during the 2016 NBA Playoffs between the San Antonio Spurs and the Memphis Grizzlies at FedExForum on April 22, 2016 in Memphis, Tennessee. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement.  (Photo by Frederick Breedon/Getty Images)

Gregg Popovich Says He Respects Athletes Protesting National Anthem


Gregg Popovich Says He Respects Athletes Protesting National Anthem

Gregg Popovich says he respects the athletes who are currently protesting the national anthem. Popovich will take over as the head coach of Team USA’s international basketball program now that Mike Krzyzewski has stepped down, which gives his stance even more weight.

While Popovich is typically reserved, he’s also thoughtful and opinionated. It’s a delicate balance he’s managed to maintain and this interview was no different. The San Antonio Spurs head coach was asked what he thinks about what’s going on in the country right now:

“I think it’s really dangerous to answer such important questions that have confounded so many people for hundreds of years, to ask me to give you my solutions, as if I had any, in 30 seconds. So if you want to be specific about a question, I’ll be more than happy to answer it because I think race is the elephant in the room in our country. The social situation that we’ve all experienced is absolutely disgusting in a lot of ways. What’s really interesting is the people that jump right away to say, one is attacking the police, or the people that jump on the other side. It’s a question where understanding and empathy has to trump, no pun intended, has to trump any quick reactions of an ideological or demagogical nature. It’s a topic that can’t just be swung at, people have to be very accurate and direct in what they say and do.”

He then said he supported and respected the athletes stepping up to protest the anthem as a way to bring awareness to injustice. His response was long but do yourself a favor and read the whole thing:

“I absolutely understand why they’re doing what they’re doing, and I respect their courage for what they’ve done. The question is whether it will do any good or not because it seems that change really seems to happen through political pressure, no matter how you look at it. Whether it’s Dr. (Martin Luther) King getting large groups together and boycotting buses, or what’s happened in Carolina with the NBA and other organizations pulling events to make it known what’s going on. But I think the important thing that Kaepernick and others have done is to keep it in the conversation. When’s the last time you heard the name Michael Brown? With our 24/7 news, things seem to drift. We’re all trying to just exist and survive.

“It’s easier for white people because we haven’t lived that experience. It’s difficult for many white people to understand the day-to-day feeling that many black people have to deal with. It’s not just a rogue policeman, or a policeman exerting too much force or power, when we know that most of the police are just trying to do their job, which is very difficult. I’d be scared to death if I was a policeman and I stopped a car. You just don’t know what’s going to happen. And part of that in our country is exacerbated by the preponderance of guns that other countries don’t have to deal with. It gets very complicated.

“At this point, when somebody like Kaepernick brings attention to this, and others who have, it makes people have to face the issue because it’s too easy to let it go because it’s not their daily experience. If it’s not your daily experience, you don’t understand it. I didn’t talk to my kids about how to act in front of a policeman when you get stopped. I didn’t have to do that. All of my black friends have done that. There’s something that’s wrong about that, and we all know that. What’s the solution? Nobody has figured it out. But for sure, the conversation has to stay fresh, it has to stay continuous, it has to be persistent, and we all have a responsibility to make sure that happens in our communities.”

Man that’s a great answer. It’s complicated but Popovich recognizes that these athletes aren’t doing this to be disrespectful, they’re trying to bring attention to something they perceive as a serious problem.

Popovich also said he would not tell his players when and where to protest and would allow them to make their own decisions.

Latest Leads

More NBA