Five Wheaton College Football Players, Including Chris Spielman's Son, Charged with Felonies for Hazing

Five Wheaton College Football Players, Including Chris Spielman's Son, Charged with Felonies for Hazing

NCAAF

Five Wheaton College Football Players, Including Chris Spielman's Son, Charged with Felonies for Hazing

A Chicago-area judge has signed arrest warrants and set bonds for five Wheaton College football players charged with aggravated battery, mob action, and unlawful restraint arising out of a 2016 Hazing incident, according to the Chicago Tribune. Included among those charged is Noah Spielman, the son of former Ohio State and Detroit linebacker Chris Spielman (currently a broadcaster for FOX Sports.)

The incident happened in March of 2016, but details had not been released until the Tribune obtained the witness statement given to police during the investigation. According to the statements, a freshman player was pulled out of his dorm room, held down, bound by duct tape, carried out of the dorm and thrown into a car by several members of the football team.
According to the victim, the players “played Middle Eastern music and made offensive comments about Muslims” and told him that he had been kidnapped by Muslims who wanted to fornicate with goats, and he was their goat. They then allegedly removed his pants and tried to insert an object into his rectum repeatedly. He was then beaten and thrown out into an off-campus baseball field and left behind.
Don’t worry, though, Wheaton College wants you to know that they took care of it, even though all five players were on the roster for last weekend’s game and three played.

The college released a statement late Monday saying it was “deeply troubled” by the allegations because it strives to provide an educational environment free from hazing and reflective of the school’s religious values. The school said it hired a third party to investigate the allegation last year and took “corrective actions,” but officials declined to provide details on any punishment, citing federal privacy laws.

Sources told the Tribune that several players were required to perform 50 hours of community service and write an eight-page essay reflecting on their behavior.

If the allegations are proven, then there will be a lot more than a written essay in the future for the players involved.

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