Try Not To Bawl As You Watch This Once-Paralyzed Georgetown Football Player Walk Across the Stage At Graduation

Try Not To Bawl As You Watch This Once-Paralyzed Georgetown Football Player Walk Across the Stage At Graduation

NCAAF

Try Not To Bawl As You Watch This Once-Paralyzed Georgetown Football Player Walk Across the Stage At Graduation

The last play Ty Williams ever made was a low tackle on a slot receiver that fractured a vertebra and left Williams with partial feeling in his legs, and no ability to move them.

That was in 2015. Two and a half years later, at Georgetown’s graduation ceremony on Saturday, Williams made another play.

Williams was the keynote speaker last year at his high school alma mater in Maryland.

From the Washington Post:

Seated in a wheelchair at DAR Constitution Hall, he never specifically mentioned his injury but spoke to the new graduates about self-motivation and determination, according to the Gaithersburg Town Courier.

“Having a positive mind-set can really change the way you see the world,” he said. “We ourselves have to be our No. 1 motivator. In hard times, when our back is against the wall and we feel like there is no way out, we have to be the first ones to tell ourselves that it’ll be okay and that we must and will overcome. . . . Through surrounding ourselves with positivity, we can breathe new life around us. We can take advantage of everything life has to offer by doing so. Do not allow yourself to be defined by yourself or by others. We are so much more than just one part of ourselves. . . . Constantly adhering your actions to please others will drain you and leave you lost in your own body.

“I hate the word ‘normal.’ It is a word of judgment and helps create the schisms, hate and prejudice we see today that separates our country and this world. There is a deep hatred rooted within this country that stems solely from the inability to accept those that are different. Putting a label on a human being is one of the greatest crimes committed day in and day out.”

Technically, Williams has remained on the Georgetown roster all along, wearing No. 2 on his chest while his teammates wore it on their helmets.

After his graduation speech, he told a local newspaper it would be just a matter of time until he would walk again.

This is where I’d generally be expected to write a poignant line. Instead, I’ll just post this video from another angle.

 

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