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Stephen A. Smith and Sean Hannity Argued About Ferguson

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Stephen A. Smith was a guest on Sean Hannity’s radio show yesterday. They began by discussing Smith’s recent suspension from ESPN. Hannity theorized that Smith’s words about women not provoking their assaults were taken out of context — nevermind that Smith was reiterating an opinion he’d had for years — by people out to get him.

After that, talk turned to Michael Brown and Ferguson. Mediaite has a partial transcription:

They kept arguing over whose testimony was right until Smith, who’d kept cautioning that the facts of the case needed to be examined before he could rush to judgment, decided to turn the questions onto Hannity. “You like to talk, so this shouldn’t be a problem. Here’s the deal: I understand your argument, but can you honestly say it would have taken six bullets to stop him if he’s unarmed?”

Hannity admitted that he didn’t understand why Brown was shot six times, but offered up an explanation: “If [Wilson] had an orbital eye socket fracture, that, to me, explains him being hit three times in the arm, and once in another place, to stop a pretty big kid from coming at him.”

“But what I’m saying to you is that you’re not a black person with that history in Ferguson, and it’s hard to fathom that it takes six bullets to stop somebody,” Smith responded. “Which is why you see people in an uproar, because they find that hard to believe.”

We’ve embedded audio below; having just listened to it, I’m not really sure whether I’d advise subjecting yourself to the conversation before heading into the weekend.

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Related: Stephen A. Smith Apologized For Not Being Articulate Enough For You To Grasp His Point About Women Provoking Domestic Violence

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